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Donor-conceived people and their parents

We hold information on all fertility treatments involving a donor since 1 August 1991. Learn more about what you can find out about your or your child’s donor and genetic siblings. 

Connecting donor-conceived people to their origins

Since 1991, we've held a database of information about every fertility treatment carried out in the UK, called the Register.

Donor-conceived people and their parents can apply to us for information held about their donor and genetic siblings on the Register. 

We also have a dedicated support service for donor-conceived people who are considering, or are actively getting in touch with, their donor or donor-conceived siblings. 

Find out more about accessing information from the Register and our support service below. 

For enquiries, contact openingtheregister@hfea.gov.uk

Your donor

It’s natural to have questions about your origins. Depending on when you were treated you may be able to apply to us for information about your donor.

Find out more about Your donor

Your genetic siblings

If you're donor-conceived, you could have one or more donor-conceived genetic siblings in up to nine other families, or you could have none.

Find out more about Your genetic siblings

Preparing to request information

Before you start the process of finding out information about your donor or genetic siblings you may want to take some time to prepare. Getting support from family and friends and thinking through some key questions will ensure you’re ready to take the next step.

Find out more about Preparing to request information

Home DNA testing and matching

Home DNA testing and matching websites have implications for donor-conceived people. Using one of the home DNA tests these sites offer plus opting in (or not ‘opting out’) of their ‘matching services’, could mean that your donor, or donor-conceived genetic siblings become identifiable to you and vice versa. It’s also possible that a donor-conceived person might be identified by inference, if they have a close genetic relative using home DNA testing and matching services. Even if the donor-conceived person has not used such a service themselves, the information from the matching service may be able to be combined with other publicly available information about the relevant person, and their donor conceived status and/or their identity could be possible to infer.

"Growing up, my donor was discussed openly in the family; it was never a secret or something I felt the need to hide."

Publication date: 16 December 2019

Review date: 16 December 2021

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